Why A Girls’ School?

“Girls in single-sex schools have higher self-esteem, are more interested in nontraditional subjects such as science and math, and are less likely to stereotype jobs and careers. They are intellectually curious, serious about their studies and achieve more.” – Drs. Myra and David Sadker

Why Choose A Girls’ School?

As girls reach early adolescence, their self-esteem and interest in certain subjects is likely to plummet as a result of being bombarded by conflicting messages about femininity and achievement. Seattle Girls’ School combats the trend of girls losing confidence before competence, especially in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and math. At SGS, girls are challenged to discover who they are and who they want to become.

Research has shown again and again that girls at single-sex schools flourish academically. Graduates of girls’ schools are more motivated, more accomplished, and have higher aspirations than their peers at coeducational schools. They will typically score 30% higher on SAT tests than the national average for girls. None of this research is a surprise to us. We know when girls feel safe and challenged, they are more willing to explore their strengths and examine areas for growth. We know they are more likely to develop a healthy self image, which means they’ll be less likely to take unhealthy risks and will feel more empowered to pursue their dreams.

Watch “The Girls’ School Advantage: By the Numbers”, by the National Coalition of Girls’ Schools, to get a glimpse of what a girls’ school can can mean for your daughter:

Failing at Fairness: How America’s Schools Cheat Girls

Middle school is a critical time in the development of girls. The research shows that as girls reach early adolescence, their self-esteem is likely to plummet, the result of being bombarded by conflicting messages about femininity and achievement from their schools, the media, and their peers. It is in these crucial years that, more often than not, girls are directly or indirectly dissuaded from certain areas of study, pressured to make decisions they later regret, and feel powerless in charting a course for future achievements.

But there is hope. Research has shown again and again that girls at single-sex schools flourish academically. Graduates of girls’ schools are more motivated, more accomplished, and have higher aspirations than their peers at coeducational schools. They will typically score 30% higher on SAT tests than the national average for girls. None of this research is a surprise to us. We know when girls feel safe and challenged, they are more willing to explore their strengths and examine areas for growth. We know they are more likely to develop a healthy self image, which means they’ll be less likely to take unhealthy risks and will feel more empowered to pursue their dreams.

Explore the following resources for more information:

  • The research of Dr. Joan Deak, SGS Advisory Board member, who provides hard data on How Girls Thrive
  • The website for the National Coalition of Girls’ Schools where you can review The Case for Girls Schools.